Via Mezzocannone Naples

The Via Mezzocannone is a street in the historical centre of Naples. It connects the Piazza San Domenico Maggiore to the Piazzetto Nilo and the Corso Umberto I. Its length is slightly less than 500 metres. One side of the street is almost completely taken up by university buildings, some of which have small science museums.

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Naples City Guide

Naples is the capital of the Campania region and the most important city in southern Italy. It is notorious because of its chaos and criminality, but also loved because of its hospitality, food and beauty. The most famous attraction is the Archaeological Museum, where most of the objects found among the ruins of Pompei and Herculaneum are preserved. Continue reading “Naples City Guide”

Palazzo Barbaja Naples

The 16th century Palazzo Barbaja in the Via Toledo in Naples received a neoclassicist make-over in the 18th century. It is named for Domenico Barbaja, a theatre producer who lived there in the 19th century. The composer Rossini also spent some time in the palazzo, which is now privately owned and has lost much of its splendour.

Palazzo Barbaja Naples

Useful information

Address: Via Toledo, 205 – Napoli. Opening hours and admission: The palace is pivate property and not open to tourists.

History and description

Palazzo Barbaja Naples
Palazzo Barbaja

Although the Palazzo Barbaja was built in the 16th century, it is named for Domenico Barbaja, who owned it in the 19th century and lived there till he died in 1841. Barbaja was born in Milan and had quite an interesting life. Apart from being the impresario of the Teatro San Carlo in Naples, he was also credited with inventing, still in Milan, the first cappuccino. In Milan he owned a chain of coffee houses and ran the gambling operation of the Teatro della Scala. During the Napoleonic wars he bought and sold ammunition.

While running the Teatro San Carlo he was supposed to have virtually locked Rossini into the Palazzo Baraja, when the latter did not finish one of the works he had been commissioned for quickly enough.

Domenico Barbaja in 1820s painting by unknown artist.
Domenico Barbaja

At the time the building included spaces for concerts and some caves that were dug out into the tuff stone walls behind it. One of these caves can be seen in a painting titled “Dining room of the Barbaja” in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Nowadays the building is a simple condominium and little is left of its original beauty. From the adjacent Santa Maria del Parto Church it is possible to see the loggia’s of the interior courtyard.

Palazzo Barbaja, Naples

Via Toledo Naples

Since its inception in the 16th century, the Via Toledo in Naples has always been one of the main historic, cultural and economic arteries of the city. It connects two of the main squares, the Piazza Dante and the Piazza Trieste e Trento and is one of the main shopping streets of Naples.

Via Toledo Naples

History and description

The Via Toledo was constructed in 1536 on the initiative of the then Viceroy Pedro Alvarez de Toledo. It has a length of 1,2 km, starts at the Piazza Dante and ends at the Piazza Trieste e Trento. It runs from north to south.

In 1870, when Rome became the capital of the new country Italy, the Via Toledo was renamed to Via Roma. In 1980 it was returned to its original name.

Since 2012, when the underground station Toledo was inaugurated, the street became predominantly pedestrian.

North of the Piazza Dante, the street continues under the name Via Enrico Pessina.

Tourist attractions

The street is lined by many shops and historic buildings. The most important buildings are the Palazzo Cirella, the Palazzo Zevallos Colonna di Stigliano, the Palazzo Lieto, the Palazzo De Rosa, the Palazzo Trabucco, the Palazzo Mastelloni and the Palazzo Doria d’Angri.

Palazzo Barbaja

Palazzo Baraja (Via Toledo, Naples)

The 16th century Palazzo Barbaja (n. 205) received a neoclassicist make-over in the 18th century. It is named for Domenico Barbaja, a theatre producer who lived there in the 19th century. The composer Rossini also spent some time in the palazzo, which is now privately owned and has lost much of its splendour.

Public transport

There are two metro stops (Dante and Toledo) in the Via Toledo.

Via Toledo, Naples